Branscombe, Nyla

Nyla
Branscombe, PhD
Year Inducted: 
2004
Nyla Branscombe
Highlights: 
  • Widely recognized expert of social prejudice, discrimination, and collective guilt
  • Published over 80 psychology journal articles and chapters
  • Received Otto-Klineberg International Relations Prize from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues
  • Associate Editor for journals Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin and Group Processes and Intergroup Relations
  • Work on perceived discrimination altered the nature of research and debate on the topic
Biography: 

Dr. Branscombe is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Kansas. She has been at KU since 1987. Dr. Branscombe has published roughly 80 journal articles and chapters. In the last two years alone, she has produced 20 publications with a majority coauthored by undergraduate or graduate students. She has chaired 11 completed Masters Theses and 8 completed Ph.D dissertations and has taught 9 Undergraduate courses and 9 Graduate level courses. She has been invited to present at the University of Queensland, the Royal Netherlands Academy of Science, the Italian National Research Institute, and the Society for Research on Aggression in Jerusalem. Her expertise in the area of social prejudice, discrimination, and collective guilt is widely recognized and commended, including her selection as the recipient of the Otto-Klineberg International Relations Prize from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. She has served as the Associate Editor for various journals including Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin and Group Processes and Intergroup Relations

Professor Branscombe's research has been focused on basic issues of Intergroup Relations--particularly how members of low and high status groups cope with threats to their social identity. Among members of low status groups, the greatest threat to social identity is that of being devalued and discriminated against by members of higher status groups. We examine how such perceived discrimination and exclusion encourages identification with the devalued group, and this in turn partially alleviates the negative consequences of expecting and actually experiencing discrimination. Among high status group members, the greatest threat to social identity is perceiving one's own group as having a history of discriminating against or otherwise harming members of a lower status group. We study how reminders of such illegitimate harm doing is coped with. In particular, we investigate the nature of collective guilt, when it is most likely to be experienced, and how collective guilt can produce reductions in prejudice.

Honors & Achievements: 
  • Dr. Branscombe is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Kansas. She has been at KU since 1987
  • Dr. Branscombe has published roughly 80 journal articles and chapters. In the last two years alone, she has produced 20 publications with a majority coauthored by undergraduate or graduate students.
  • She has chaired 11 completed Masters Theses and 8 completed Ph.D Dissertations and has taught 9 Undergraduate courses and 9 Graduate level courses
  • She has been invited to present at the University of Queensland, the Royal Netherlands Academy of Science, the Italian National Research Institute, and the Society for Research on Aggression in Jerusalem
  • Her expertise in the area of social prejudice, discrimination, and collective guilt is widely recognized and commended, including her selection as the recipient of the Otto-Klineberg International Relations Prize from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues
  • She has served as the Associate Editor for various journals including Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin and Group Processes and Intergroup Relations

Signup for our e-Newsletter
Calendar of Events